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Thread: All fightwear is gay and anyone wearing...

  1. #101

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    i dont see a problem wearing it! i mean its something you should be proud of right? if you played for chelsea for example you wold wear your football top wouldnt you?

    for the record i dont wear my fight wear out and about but i dont see nothign wrong with it.

  2. #102

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    Quote Originally Posted by Basilisk View Post
    The problem is the gay-ness.
    there is nothing wrong with gay-ness xxx

  3. #103

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    Yes Basilisk and if you are not careful Azzy might show you WOT IS WOT where gayness is concerned:eek: then you'll just have to pray Basi that your legendary serpant powers work and Azzy's dont

  4. #104

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    Quote Originally Posted by ginandtonic View Post
    Yes Basilisk and if you are not careful Azzy might show you WOT IS WOT where gayness is concerned:eek: then you'll just have to pray Basi that your legendary serpant powers work and Azzy's dont
    BWAHHH HAAA HA HAAA

  5. #105

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    ok, what about wearing a club shirt out shopping ? I seen a guy in the shopping center the other week sporting a "Royce Gracie accademy t shirt" , i had just been training, popped in to get some Sushi (yeah fck off before you start) , the dude just gave me a nod and walked off...... whats the problem, i had a club hoodie on and track pants....

    this thread is gay

    If you need a friend, get a dog !
    http://www.PositiveAggression.co.uk/

  6. #106

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    Either intentionally or unintentionally MMA has spawned a fashion centered around the standard "urban or streetwear" garments of the hoodie and Tee shirt. It has done this in much the same way as Skateboarding and Surfing did in the 1970's. Back then both these activities were niche yet the fashions and brands that come from them are now multi million dollar global corporates. MMA is having the same effect. The MMA "look" is being picked up at street level and taken beyond the community of the sport. I can walk round the Trafford Center and see quite a few "surf" shops but I have never seem much surfing taking place on the Manchester Ship Canal. The number of "skate" inspired clothing brands and shops which sell sell them is far disproportionate to the number of people who actually own a skateboard. How many people would comment on someone wearing VANS or DC shoes and say "that person is a prick as he is in Tesco and doesn't have his skateboard with him" I am guessing that most people wouldn't even notice. How many people own a pair of Billabong or O'Neil shorts but have never been surfing ?

    Part of the reason for the boom in MMA apparel is precisely because the Surf and Skate brands have become multinational corporations. They have in effect lost the very thing that made then exciting, radical, new and most importantly "real". MMA is filling this void. People are picking up on the MMA look not necessarily because they train or even follow MMA but because (for the moment) the brands are still independent, work at grass roots levels and are "real". They actually represent and live the life they purport to. The largest MMA brand by far is TapouT. Yet even these are still tiny in global terms. Billabong will sell more in the UK alone than TapouT will sell globally and TapouT is still owned by the guys who set up the company and these guys though not competitors, still train (BJJ). Sinister, another one of the major MMA brands, is still owned by Anderson Silva's Manager a guy still very very involved with the sport at all levels.

    MMA apparel is beginning to cross over into fashion for fashion's sake simply because it still represents what it says it does.

  7. #107

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    Well said my friend! well said!


    Quote Originally Posted by Fightshop.Com View Post
    Either intentionally or unintentionally MMA has spawned a fashion centered around the standard "urban or streetwear" garments of the hoodie and Tee shirt. It has done this in much the same way as Skateboarding and Surfing did in the 1970's. Back then both these activities were niche yet the fashions and brands that come from them are now multi million dollar global corporates. MMA is having the same effect. The MMA "look" is being picked up at street level and taken beyond the community of the sport. I can walk round the Trafford Center and see quite a few "surf" shops but I have never seem much surfing taking place on the Manchester Ship Canal. The number of "skate" inspired clothing brands and shops which sell sell them is far disproportionate to the number of people who actually own a skateboard. How many people would comment on someone wearing VANS or DC shoes and say "that person is a prick as he is in Tesco and doesn't have his skateboard with him" I am guessing that most people wouldn't even notice. How many people own a pair of Billabong or O'Neil shorts but have never been surfing ?

    Part of the reason for the boom in MMA apparel is precisely because the Surf and Skate brands have become multinational corporations. They have in effect lost the very thing that made then exciting, radical, new and most importantly "real". MMA is filling this void. People are picking up on the MMA look not necessarily because they train or even follow MMA but because (for the moment) the brands are still independent, work at grass roots levels and are "real". They actually represent and live the life they purport to. The largest MMA brand by far is TapouT. Yet even these are still tiny in global terms. Billabong will sell more in the UK alone than TapouT will sell globally and TapouT is still owned by the guys who set up the company and these guys though not competitors, still train (BJJ). Sinister, another one of the major MMA brands, is still owned by Anderson Silva's Manager a guy still very very involved with the sport at all levels.

    MMA apparel is beginning to cross over into fashion for fashion's sake simply because it still represents what it says it does.

  8. #108

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    Point taken about people with 'attitude' wearing combat sports related clothing,whether it be t-shirts or hoodies with karate,kung-fu,judo,or MMA....logos on them.

    Big deal.....plenty of people with 'bad' attitudes wear all sorts of clothing and are more likely to be wearing all kinds of clothing with different 'urban' logos than just MMA related stuff.People are just as likely to be wearing Nike,Umbro clothing,Londsdale,or Everlast boxing related clothing,or a myriad of music related clothing. Take your pick. As MMA grows in the mainstream more clothes will be sold and worn by 'casual' fans. Good.

    I think it's ridiculous to suggest that MMAers,whether they be fighters,casual fans,or people who may simply like a particular item of clothing,should somehow be singled out to NOT wear any clothing related to their sport in public,.....just in case it offends/frightens somebody into thinking you might be able to fight (or not ,as the case may be) and therefore are to be classed as being overtly aggressive.

    Why not apply the same sweeping generalisation to people who like other sports clothing...whether they are professionals in that particular sport or not? -wrestling,skateboard streetwear,surf wear with logos like 'Bad Intentions',or 'Grind till i you die',.....or things like basketball clothing,rugby shirts,football clothing,or tracksuits & related casual t-shirts,etc.

    Hey,why not apply the same criteria to anybody wearing clothing unrelated to any activity they actually indulge in?

    I don't see people in other sports getting all hot and bothered that the public want to buy and wear clothes related to their sport of choice.

    Just because a few people want to show the world that they're 'hard' or 'hip' doesn't mean that it is the only representation /signification any type of sports clothing must demonstrate.

    And,.....if you want to go to the supermarket,or anywhere else and are still wearing your MT shorts after a session,or you can't be a(r)sed to change,who cares? Go about your business in peace and don't buy the suggestion that you're supposed to hide part of who you are and what you do because some people give off the wrong impression,or others might have a misconception about what you represent,or feel threatened because of a sports related item of clothing.

    Second that thought about the armchair pundits.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]"Smell the Glove".Katsu(Zen)

    Sponsored by: www.cagedsteel.com

    Supporting :Times A.B.C www.timesabc.org.uk/about-us.html

  9. #109

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    Quote Originally Posted by Fightshop.Com View Post
    Either intentionally or unintentionally MMA has spawned a fashion centered around the standard "urban or streetwear" garments of the hoodie and Tee shirt. It has done this in much the same way as Skateboarding and Surfing did in the 1970's. Back then both these activities were niche yet the fashions and brands that come from them are now multi million dollar global corporates. MMA is having the same effect. The MMA "look" is being picked up at street level and taken beyond the community of the sport. I can walk round the Trafford Center and see quite a few "surf" shops but I have never seem much surfing taking place on the Manchester Ship Canal. The number of "skate" inspired clothing brands and shops which sell sell them is far disproportionate to the number of people who actually own a skateboard. How many people would comment on someone wearing VANS or DC shoes and say "that person is a prick as he is in Tesco and doesn't have his skateboard with him" I am guessing that most people wouldn't even notice. How many people own a pair of Billabong or O'Neil shorts but have never been surfing ?

    Part of the reason for the boom in MMA apparel is precisely because the Surf and Skate brands have become multinational corporations. They have in effect lost the very thing that made then exciting, radical, new and most importantly "real". MMA is filling this void. People are picking up on the MMA look not necessarily because they train or even follow MMA but because (for the moment) the brands are still independent, work at grass roots levels and are "real". They actually represent and live the life they purport to. The largest MMA brand by far is TapouT. Yet even these are still tiny in global terms. Billabong will sell more in the UK alone than TapouT will sell globally and TapouT is still owned by the guys who set up the company and these guys though not competitors, still train (BJJ). Sinister, another one of the major MMA brands, is still owned by Anderson Silva's Manager a guy still very very involved with the sport at all levels.

    MMA apparel is beginning to cross over into fashion for fashion's sake simply because it still represents what it says it does.
    Good post.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]"Smell the Glove".Katsu(Zen)

    Sponsored by: www.cagedsteel.com

    Supporting :Times A.B.C www.timesabc.org.uk/about-us.html

  10. #110

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    If you own a pair of jeans and aren't a laborer you cant really criticise.

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