Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 29

Thread: Reply from uksport.gov.uk

  1. #1

    Default Reply from uksport.gov.uk

    Dear Mr McFall

    Your enquiry about forming a Governing Body for Mixed Martial Arts has been passed to me.

    The Sports Councils have guidelines and criteria for recognition of a sport and governing body, which I attach. These are currently under review. For martial arts the Sports Councils would consider an application covering the activity and the governing body. The Sports Councils already recognise separate bodies for the likes of Judo, karate, taekwondo, etc.

    You will note from the criteria that establishing a Governing Body for an activity, particularly one as diverse as MMA, would be a considerable undertaking. It may well be worth taking legal advice quite early on.

    UK Sport remit is primarily focused on Olympic and Paralympic sport. Our dealings with non-Olympic sports are few and we do not have resources that we can devote to helping potential governing bodies to develop.

    I hope you find the attached of help.

    Yours sincerely
    Peter Smith

  2. #2

    Default

    Attatched document :-

    ----------------------------

    UK Sport and Home Country Sports Councils’ Process for the Recognition of Sporting Activities and Governing Bodies of Sport
    INTRODUCTION
    Recognition is a process, agreed jointly by the Home Country Sports Councils and UK Sport, to determine, for the Sports Councils, what is a sporting activity and to establish which organisations govern the sporting activity on a Home Country and UK basis.
    The recognition policy and processes have been revised to ensure their relevance to sport in the 21st Century.

    The recognition process operates in two parts:

    1: Recognition of a sporting activity – this must be agreed across the four Home Country Sports Councils in the UK;

    2: Recognition of the governing body for the sport. This recognition can be at two levels:

    Recognition of a governing body for the sport at a UK or GB level, which will be considered by all the Sports Councils in the UK*;

    Recognition of a governing body for the sport within England, Northern Ireland/Ulster, Scotland or Wales, which will be considered by the relevant Sports Council for that country.

    * It should be noted that recognition of a UK body does not automatically mean that any Home Country Branch of that body will be recognised by the Home County Sports Council - an application will have to be made by the Home Country governing body to the relevant Sports Council.

    General Principles

    The principles behind recognition are as follows:

    The Sports Councils are keen to promote the efficient administration of sport and therefore will endeavour to link new sporting activities to existing sporting activities where reasonable;

    2. The Sports Councils have adopted the definition of sport contained in the Council of Europe’s European Sports Charter 1993 as one of the primary criteria*they use when assessing applications for recognising sporting activities. The UK is a member state of the Council of Europe and the European Sports Charter recommends that member states base their national sporting policies on the Charter. It also recommends that their national sporting organisations take account of the Charter’s principles when setting policy.

    The Sports Councils will recognise ONE governing body per sport as the lead organisation for the governance, control and development of the sporting activity;

    Where the Sports Councils currently recognise more than one governing body per sport, the Councils will pro-actively encourage amalgamation over the period to March 2009. From April 2009, the Sports Councils will normally only recognise one governing body per sport.

    The recognition of a sporting activity or governing body of sport does not necessarily mean eligibility or entitlement to Sports Councils investment or services.

    Recognition of a governing body does not mean that the Sports Councils have approved or accredited the quality of the governing body’s management or development programmes. Such issues will be taken into consideration as part of any investment process;

    Whilst this process applies to all recognised sporting activities and governing bodies, the Sports Councils do not intend to undertake a review of every sporting activity or governing body currently included on the Sports Councils’ recognised list. However, individual activities and governing bodies will be reviewed where a need is identified.

    8. The Sports Councils reserve the right to consult with any organisation or individual when assessing applications for recognition of sporting activities or governing bodies.

    9. The Sports Councils reserve the right to review this process at any time.


    For Further details on the recognition process including recognition criteria, please click on the links below or alternatively contact one of the Sports Councils.


    UK Sport www.uksport.gov.uk
    info@uksport.gov.uk
    Tel: 020 7211 5100 40 Bernard Street
    London WC1N 1ST

    Sport England www.sportengland.org
    info@sportengland.org
    Tel: 0845 508508 3rd Floor
    Victoria House
    Bloomsbury Square
    London WC1B 4SE

    Sports Council for Northern Ireland www.sportni.net
    info@sportni.net
    Tel: 0280 381222 House of Sport
    Upper Malone Road
    Belfast BT9 5LA

    Sport Scotland www.sportsscotland.org.uk
    library@sportscotland.org.uk
    Tel: 0131 317200 Caledonia House
    South Gyle
    Edinburgh
    EH12 9DQ
    Sports Council Wales www.sports-council-wales.co.uk
    publicity@scw.co.uk
    Tel: 02920 338200 Sophia Gardens
    Cardiff
    CF11 9SW

  3. #3

    Default

    A. GUIDELINES ON THE RECOGNITION OF A SPORTING ACTIVITY


    1. How does an organisation in the UK apply to the Sports Councils for the recognition of a sporting activity?

    An organisation applying for recognition of a sporting activity should initially contact the Sports Council of the country in which it is based to check the current list of recognised sporting activities, discuss the proposed application and request an application form.

    The completed application form, together with the required supporting documentation, should be returned to the same Sports Council for assessment. All applicants are strongly advised to seek clarification from Sport Council Officers when completing their application form.

    Assessment meetings are normally held twice per year, usually in July and in January. Application forms must be returned to the relevant Sports Council at least 3 months prior to the assessment meeting, to ensure inclusion in that particular assessment meeting:


    Submission Date to Sports Council Assessment Meeting
    31st March July
    30th September January

    2. What is the assessment process?

    An Officer from the relevant Sports Council will make an initial assessment of the application, using the assessment criteria outlined below. If any clarification or additional information is required, the Officer will contact the applicant.

    The application, together with the initial assessment, will be considered by the Joint Sports Councils’ Panel on Recognition. Normally, one of the following recommendations will be made:

    Recognition of the sporting activity;
    Recognition of the activity as a discipline within an already recognised sporting activity
    Refusal of recognition
    Deferment of a decision

    The Panel may decide to invite representatives of the applicant organisation to attend the meeting at which the application is considered.

    The Panel’s recommendation is then presented to each of the four Home Country Sports Councils for decision. Depending on the schedule of Sports Council meetings, this process may take up to three months. All four Home Country Sports Councils must agree to recognise a sporting activity if the application is to be successful.

    The Sports Council that received the application will inform the applicant of the outcome.



    3. What assessment criteria do the Sports Councils use?
    The Sports Councils assessment of sporting activity applications is based on the following criteria. A successful application will be expected to fulfil all these criteria.
    Essential Purpose
    The purpose of the activity must be sporting and not a means to another purpose.
    The Council of Europe’s European Sports Charter 1993 definition of sport
    The sporting activity must meet the definition of sport contained in the Council of Europe’s European Sports Charter 1993, which is:

    “Sport means all forms of physical activity which, through casual or organised participation aim at expressing or improving physical fitness and mental well-being forming social relationships or obtaining results in competition at all levels.”
    Rules and Organisation
    The sporting activity must have an established structure, defined by rules, and where appropriate, organised national or international competition.
    Uniqueness
    The sporting activity must be physically or culturally unique, and not a variation of an already recognised sport. Where an activity is similar or closely aligned to a sporting activity that is already recognised, the Sports Councils reserve the right to consult with the body that manages that sporting activity.
    Sustainability
    The sporting activity must demonstrate that it is here to stay, through levels of sustained participation or a relationship to significant international participation.
    Risk
    The Sports Councils reserve the right to defer an application for recognition of a sporting activity until its is made in conjunction with a governing body application, where a sporting activity involves a level of risk requiring management by a suitably positioned National Governing Body.
    Other Considerations
    Political, moral, ethical and legal considerations will be taken into account when assessing the application for recognition of a sporting activity. A sport must also demonstrate that there are no barriers to participation that could be viewed as creating inequity of access.


    4. Is Recognition of a sporting activity awarded for a limited period of time?

    There is no specified time limit on the recognition of a sporting activity. However, the Sports Councils reserve the right to review any activity they recognise (e.g. if a change in the law affected the legality of the sporting activity). Such a review would include extensive consultation with those involved with the sport. The outcome of a review would either be continued recognition or de-recognition of a sporting activity.



    5. If an organisation’s application for recognition of a sporting activity is unsuccessful, can it re-apply?

    Yes, the organisation can re-apply, although the Sports Councils will not normally consider a new application for a period of two years from the date of the decision.


    6. Is there an Appeals Procedure?

    If an applicant wishes to appeal against a decision, it should contact the Sports Council to whom it applied for recognition of its sporting activity. Appeals regarding the recognition of a sporting activity will normally be decided by the UK Chief Officers Group, who will inform the Sports Council of the decision.

  4. #4

    Default

    B. GUIDELINES ON THE RECOGNITION OF A GB/UK NATIONAL GOVERNING BODY


    1. What geographical area does a UK/GB governing body have to cover?

    A governing body claiming jurisdiction over the UK/GB should be able to evidence:

    That it represents the sport across the UK/GB, and its recognition as the UK body is supported by the representative groups in:

    a. England, Scotland and Wales for a governing body claiming to cover Great Britain; and
    b. England, Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland for a governing body claiming to cover the United Kingdom.

    That the representative groupings in the Home Countries have an agreed voice within the UK/GB structure.


    2. How does a UK/GB governing body apply for recognition?

    A UK/GB governing body applying for recognition should initially contact the Sports Council of the country in which it is based, to discuss the proposed application and request an application form.

    The completed application form, together with the required supporting documentation should be returned to the same Sports Council for assessment. All applicants are strongly advised to seek clarification from Sport Council Officers when completing their application form.

    Assessment meetings are held twice per year, normally in July and January. Application forms must be returned to the relevant Sports Council at least 3 months prior to the assessment meeting:


    Submission Date to Sports Council Assessment Meeting
    31st March July
    30th September January


    3. What is the assessment process?

    An Officer from the Sports Council receiving the application will make an initial assessment of the application using the assessment criteria outlined below. If any clarification or additional information is required, the Officer will contact the applicant governing body.

    The application, together with the initial assessment, will be considered by the Joint Sports Councils’ Officers Panel on Recognition. Normally, one of the following recommendations will be made:

    Unconditional offer of recognition status;
    Conditional offer of recognition status with a time-limited period to rectify any areas that were below acceptable level;
    Refusal of recognition status.

    The Panel may decide to invite representatives of the governing body to attend the meeting at which the application is considered.

    The Panel’s recommendation is presented to each of the Sports Councils (with the exception of the Sports Council for Northern Ireland in the case of GB governing bodies) for decision. Depending on the schedule of Sports Council meetings, this process may take up to three months. Each of the Sports Councils must agree to recognise a governing body for the application to be successful.

    The Sports Council that received the application will inform the applicant of the outcome.


    4. What assessment criteria do the Sports Councils use?
    The assessment of governing body applications is based on the following criteria. A successful application will be expected to fulfil all these criteria.
    Recognised Sporting Activity
    The sporting activity, which the governing body is claiming to govern, must already be included on the recognised sporting activity list.
    Uniqueness
    There is no other governing body (recognised or unrecognised) that could better govern and develop the sport.
    UK/GB Wide Support
    The governing body can demonstrate support from representative groups in England, Scotland, Wales and (for UK governing bodies) Northern Ireland.
    Sustainability
    The governing body has been established for a minimum of two years and can demonstrate this by forwarding a copy of its signed constitution and its Annual General Meeting minutes and accounts for the preceding two years.
    International Affiliation
    The governing body can demonstrate it is affiliated or is in the process of affiliating to the International governing body for the sport (as appropriate to the sport).
    Governance Structure
    An appropriate constitution and statement on anti doping, child protection and equity are in place and have been formally adopted by the governing body.
    Membership and Participation
    The governing body seeking recognition has demonstrated significant membership in terms of affiliated membership, club structures, participation, etc.
    Influence and Control
    The governing body can demonstrate that it has reasonable influence in the context of the sport controlled, e.g. in terms of governing the rules of the sporting activity within the jurisdiction, the training and education of coaches and officials.

  5. #5

    Default

    5. Is governing body recognition awarded for a limited period of time?

    There is no time limit on the recognition of a governing body. However, the Sports Councils have the right to review the recognition of a governing body in its jurisdiction if there are concerns that the organisation is no longer meeting the recognition criteria, if the status of the governing body or the sporting activity which it governs changes significantly, or another body claims to govern the sport.


    6. If a governing body’s recognition status if reviewed, what process does it entail?

    For governing bodies that are in receipt of Sports Council funding, the review process will normally be integrated within Sports Councils’ ongoing governing body audit process.

    For a recognised governing body that is not involved in the audit process, the review will involve re-visiting the initial recognition application form (if this exists) or completing a new application form.

    The Sports Council undertaking the review will present an assessment report for consideration to the UK Sports Councils Panel on Recognition. The Panel may decide to invite representatives of the governing body to attend the meeting.

    The Group will make one of the following recommendations:

    Unconditional re-endorsement of the governing body’s recognition status;
    Conditional re-endorsement of the governing boy’s recognition status with a time-limited period to rectify any areas that were below acceptable level, but within the context of achieving an acceptable standard overall;
    Withdrawal of recognition status.

    The Panel’s recommendation is put forward to each of the Sports Councils for decision and the relevant Sports Council advises the applicant body of its decision.


    7. What happens if two governing bodies are seeking Sports Council recognition as the governing body for the same sport?

    If one of the governing bodies is already recognised by the Sports Councils, the relevant Sports Council will inform that body that a review process is to be instigated due to an application being made by a second organisation.

    Both governing bodies will be invited to complete and forward an application form, together with the required supporting information to the relevant Sports Council for assessment. If audit information is available, this will be taken into account.

    An Officer from the relevant Sports Council will make an initial assessment of both governing bodies using the assessment criteria. If any clarification or additional information is required, the Officer will contact the relevant governing body.

    The two applications, together with the initial assessment report, will be considered by the Joint Sports Councils’ Officer Panel on Recognition. The Panel may decide to invite representatives from one or both governing bodies to attend the meeting at which the application is considered. The Group will normally make one of the following recommendations:

    Reject the unrecognised body’s application and award unconditional or conditional endorsement of the currently recognised governing body’s recognition status;
    Withdraw recognition from the currently recognised governing body and award unconditional or conditional recognition status to the second body;
    If both bodies are currently unrecognised to award conditional or unconditional recognition to one body and reject the application made by the other body;
    Withhold recognition status from both bodies on the basis that neither body has sufficiently demonstrated that it meets the recognition criteria, or that neither body has demonstrated that it is significantly better placed to represent the interests of the sport than the other.

    The Panel’s recommendation is presented to each of the Sports Councils for decision, and to UK Sport for final endorsement of the decision. All five Sports Councils must agree to recognise the GB/UK governing body if the application is to be successful The relevant Sports Council advises both governing bodies of the decision.


    8. Can the Sports Councils withdraw recognition from a governing body?

    Yes the Councils can withdraw recognition. Some of the circumstances where recognition can be withdrawn are listed below, although this list is not exhaustive:

    The activity is no longer recognised;
    The governing body is dissolved;
    The governing body fails to demonstrate it is meeting the recognition criteria;
    The governing body fails to supply the requested supporting material to demonstrate that it meets the recognition criteria;
    Recognition has been conferred on another governing body that has demonstrated it is the best-placed agency to develop and manage the sport.


    9. If a governing body application for recognition is unsuccessful, can it re-apply?

    Yes, the governing body can re-apply, although the Sports Councils will not normally consider a new application for a period of one year from the date of the decision.

    In cases where two governing bodies have applied for recognition as the governing body for the same sport, within the same jurisdiction, the body(ies) that has (have) not been awarded recognition cannot normally re-apply for a period of three years.

    The Sports Councils would encourage governing bodies that are “competing” to govern a sport within the same jurisdiction to work together to adopt a unified approach.


    10. Is there an Appeals Procedure?

    If a Governing Body wishes to appeal against a decision, it should contact the Sports Council to whom it applied for recognition. Appeals regarding the recognition of a UK/GB governing body will be considered by the UK Chief Officers Group and presented to the UK Sport Board for decision.

  6. #6

    Default

    Good stuff mate, will have a read at work tomorrow and see what potential problems stick out. Suggest others do the same
    www.vtjiujitsu.co.uk - Part of the Bristol Alliance

    Wiltshire's Strongest Person 2008

    House of Pain Bantamweight British Champion

    Rally driver extraordinaire!

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mc6pack View Post

    4. What assessment criteria do the Sports Councils use?

    ...

    Sustainability
    The governing body has been established for a minimum of two years and can demonstrate this by forwarding a copy of its signed constitution and its Annual General Meeting minutes and accounts for the preceding two years.

    International Affiliation
    The governing body can demonstrate it is affiliated or is in the process of affiliating to the International governing body for the sport (as appropriate to the sport).
    I don't want to be negative, but these two things would immediately appear to scream out as problems if you really are after recognition from UK Sport any time soon.

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Russ L View Post
    I don't want to be negative, but these two things would immediately appear to scream out as problems if you really are after recognition from UK Sport any time soon.
    something for the future, it basically means that its gonna take 2 years for the government to recognise the committee regardless of "when" it is put in place.. it will still take 2 years if its put in place 10 years from now. It's not a problem, just a process.

  9. #9

    Default

    Their recommendation on seeking legal advice is a good idea - that would be costly though
    www.vtjiujitsu.co.uk - Part of the Bristol Alliance

    Wiltshire's Strongest Person 2008

    House of Pain Bantamweight British Champion

    Rally driver extraordinaire!

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh View Post
    Their recommendation on seeking legal advice is a good idea - that would be costly though
    It may not be too bad if were going the non-profit org route, as there is free legal advice offered by the government and other organisations, its just a case of finding it, but i know its there lol.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

This website uses cookies to enhance user experience. They can be disabled at any time. Please see our FAQ's for details.