Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Learning to Box

  1. #1

    Default Learning to Box

    Ian Butlin said that you learn to box at an amateur gym, but develop your style at a pro gym.

    I have a question.. wouldn't the instruction be better at a pro gym? Why can't you start off at a gym which has pro boxers training/ competiting there?

  2. #2
    steve_langford
    Guest

    Default

    I thought you could learn boxing anywhere? just put a pair of gloves on and whack a bag mate.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 123 MMA View Post
    Ian Butlin said that you learn to box at an amateur gym, but develop your style at a pro gym.

    I have a question.. wouldn't the instruction be better at a pro gym? Why can't you start off at a gym which has pro boxers training/ competiting there?
    The style in amateur and pro are different. None is better than the other. For example going out and trying to just look the aggresor in an international amatur contest will get you no points. Then going out looking to score just points in a pro fight will most prob get you knocked out.

    What ever style you adopt will fit into mma. The stand up game in mma isnt as technical to say one style suits it better than another.

    So the answer to your question is you can, start off anyway you want, amateur or pro.

  4. #4
    boxingbrit
    Guest

    Default

    In America it is very different, you have many coaches and get a lot more one on one attention. Even amateur gyms over here it can be hard as there are so many people and they have to concentrate more on those representing the team.

    The comment i made was a generalisation from my experience travelling around boxing gyms amateur and pro, in this country and also from my bro's experience travelling down the US/ Mexican west coast boxing.

  5. #5

    Default

    I found american boxers technique is much more crisp which is probably due to the one on one attention boxing brit was mentioning, i think amatuer boxing is very useful establishing a solid jab and a good defense, that points fighting mentality like in karate is useful in mma as being able to land first with small gloves is a huge advantage, i box less now and grapple a lot more, but there is a small club down the road where the coach gives you one on one mittwork and you get some sparring done.
    "A boxer is the best predator on land. The Lion, but throw him in the shark tank and he becomes just another meal" Renzo Gracie.

  6. #6
    boxingbrit
    Guest

    Default

    When teaching basics most amateur clubs wont teach you the 'points scoring' style first anyway. Many will teach you how to box, let you hit bags and pads. The Uk isnt brilliant at teaching the points scoring IMHO. Look at the eastern europeans and Cubans and you will see they have it mastered.

    In America there is a bigger difference between amateur and pro teaching even though they are more likely to train in the same gyms since the ban over here. The cubans even train to the point of pivotting tkeep there back to a corner and not the ropes so that they can be seen by all 5 judges all the time.

    IMO all the styles are still beneficial for MMA, footwork, ringcraft, angles, sharp punching, slipping etc are all well worth learning from boxing to adapt to MMA.

  7. #7

    Default

    ^Agree with this, boxing imo is the biggest weakness in top flight mma, when you see a solid boxer with good defense in the ufc it makes a huge difference.
    "A boxer is the best predator on land. The Lion, but throw him in the shark tank and he becomes just another meal" Renzo Gracie.

  8. #8

    Default

    When I started boxing I didn't want to go to a Pro gym because I thought I would look stupid at a gym that had countless british champions and an intercontinental or something I can't remember at the time, so I started at a shitty gym where they basically taught me to swing for the fences, after 2 months I got bored, bit the bullet and went down to the gym where I developed at a lightening pace and ended with an amatuer record of 21-3-2
    Taking this shit, one day at a time.

  9. #9
    boxingbrit
    Guest

    Default

    I agree you have to watch out for amateur gyms with no pedigree. People can open up an amateur club with just a couple of weekends courses and no boxing experience (although they have to be recommended i think still). Check em out before you start.

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boxingbrit View Post
    In America it is very different, you have many coaches and get a lot more one on one attention. Even amateur gyms over here it can be hard as there are so many people and they have to concentrate more on those representing the team.

    The comment i made was a generalisation from my experience travelling around boxing gyms amateur and pro, in this country and also from my bro's experience travelling down the US/ Mexican west coast boxing.
    What is Andy up to now mate,is he Boxing anymore?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

This website uses cookies to enhance user experience. They can be disabled at any time. Please see our FAQ's for details.