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Thread: Teaching kids

  1. #1

    Default Teaching kids

    Hello, just to fill you in, since being made redundant i became self employed and now teach freestyle wrestling in schools.

    now i have a fair amount on experience teaching kids as i do it at our main club, but recently i was asked to teach an after school club.

    now i have come across some kids low on the intelligence scale but these ones i taught take the biscuit.
    some of them are as thick as planks and others either back answer trying to be clever or will not complete the exercises i set for them.
    besides slamming them on there heads can anyone give me some hints and tips on how to deal with them except for banning them from coming to the class?

    thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    Default

    Show them some UFC videos... and say, do what I say and this could be you!

  3. #3

    Default

    i know its cliche but ignore them focus on the others or they may have attention deficite disorder if thats what its called when there hyper constantly so just try get them doing fast moving exercises to intice them

  4. #4
    Moderator ross90's Avatar
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    ADHD?? In my day they called it acting like a cunt.....

    The ones who don't want to pay attention, leave to their own devices, dont instruct them, don't rise to them. Like jonno said, show videos, every kid loved to watch vids in school. wrestling vids, slams etc. then some UFC vids explain how wrestling is a fundamental part in MMA. Maybe get a partner in so you can go full throttle sparring on him, show them all how the moves work in a sparring enviornment.

    Tell them that you'll show them an awesome move at the end that they can practise if they do the drills and get through the lesson to a good standard. bit of insentive.

    Hope that helps
    How you expect to run with the wolves come night when you spend all day sparring with the puppies

  5. #5

    Default

    You have to accept not everyone cares or will participate. As said focus on those who want to learn.

    I'm sure some humbling the easily distracted will motivate some of the others to take heed in class.

    I'd approach some of the easilly distracted one on one and mention that they don't look interested and wondered if you could do anything in the class to engage them better. Most disruptive candidates tend to do it because they want attention, but doing that in class in coutner productive

  6. #6
    Senior Member mmamomma's Avatar
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    Default

    I'm sure Sherlock will want to comment on this, he teaches in schools every week & comes back stressed to the eyeballs every time!

  7. #7

    Default

    Solution: come to my school.
    BJJ White belt, 2 stripes.

    General badmotherfucker.

  8. #8

    Default

    Treat them like equals. Don't push them but speak to them without making a distinction between them as students or you as the teaxher. Clearly when teaching wrestling you will have to be clear when they have to pay attention but by treating them in this way they will begin to treat you with respect.

    I know this from experience in some pretty bad schools. I mean real nutter schools were its common for the kids to smoke weed' turn up drunk in the morning and fight with weapons, and these were the 13 to 14 year olds

  9. #9

    Default

    Just do what my ABC does with mouthy kids....

    Quicky respond 'Shut the fuck up or yer out!'

    Works wonders.

  10. #10

    Default

    what age group are they?

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