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Thread: The Amazing Thread!

  1. #1

    Default The Amazing Thread!

    Sailing Stones
    The mysterious moving stones of the packed-mud desert of Death Valley have been a centre of scientific controversy for decades. Rocks weighing up to hundreds of pounds have been known to move up to hundreds of yards at a time. Some scientists have proposed that a combination of strong winds and surface ice account for these movements. However, this theory does not explain evidence of different rocks starting side by side and moving at different rates and in disparate directions. Moreover, the physics calculations do not fully support this theory as wind speeds of hundreds of miles per hour would be needed to move some of the stones.



    Columnar Basalt
    When a thick lava flow cools it contracts vertically but cracks perpendicular to its directional flow with remarkable geometric regularity - in most cases forming a regular grid of remarkable hexagonal extrusions that almost appear to be made by man. One of the most famous such examples is the Giant's Causeway on the coast of Ireland (shown above) though the largest and most widely recognized would be Devil's Tower in Wyoming . Basalt also forms different but equally fascinating ways when eruptions are exposed to air or water.




    Blue Holes
    Blue holes are giant and sudden drops in underwater elevation that get their name from the dark and foreboding blue tone they exhibit when viewed from above in relationship to surrounding waters. They can be hundreds of feet deep and while divers are able to explore some of them they are largely devoid of oxygen that would support sea life due to poor water circulation - leaving them eerily empty. Some blue holes, however, contain ancient fossil remains that have been discovered, preserved in their depths.


    I don't believe in belts. There should be no ranking system for toughness.

  2. #2

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    Mammatus Clouds
    True to their ominous appearance, mammatus clouds are often harbingers of a coming storm or other extreme weather system. Typically composed primarily of ice, they can extend for hundreds of miles in each direction and individual formations can remain visibly static for ten to fifteen minutes at a time. While they may appear foreboding they are merely the messengers - appearing around, before or even after severe weather.

    I don't believe in belts. There should be no ranking system for toughness.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrHillman View Post
    Mammatus Clouds
    True to their ominous appearance, mammatus clouds are often harbingers of a coming storm or other extreme weather system. Typically composed primarily of ice, they can extend for hundreds of miles in each direction and individual formations can remain visibly static for ten to fifteen minutes at a time. While they may appear foreboding they are merely the messengers - appearing around, before or even after severe weather.
    AMAZING

    Those clouds are awesome

  4. #4

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    Eyjafjallajoekull volcano

    Spectacular pictures have been captured of a lightning display over Iceland's Eyjafjallajoekull volcano which continues to erupt.
    Hundreds of thousands of people have been stranded across the globe as a result of the eruption which has shut down the airspace across Europe for the fifth day in a row.
    More than 25,000 flights have so far been grounded in what has been billed as the single biggest aviation incident since the Second World War.

    I don't believe in belts. There should be no ranking system for toughness.

  5. #5

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    Good stuff MrHillman

    Here r more iceland volcano pics

    http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/201...llajokull.html

    (Also, 1st post here, how do I edit/apply an avatar/sig)

  6. #6

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    Pink and White Terraces

    Natural Wonders from New Zealand that just memories because destroyed by the Tarawera volcanic eruption in 1886. The natural phenomenon of warm water that formed by geysers that blast down the hillside across the thickness of ice left, the largest pool of warm water was recorded around 3 acres. Before the destruction of this phenomenon, It belongs to ” The Eighth Wonder of the World “.






  7. #7
    settings/edit profile Jimmy Boogaloo's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thelegend View Post
    Good stuff MrHillman

    Here r more iceland volcano pics

    http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/201...llajokull.html

    (Also, 1st post here, how do I edit/apply an avatar/sig)
    welcome to the forum
    'I'm not saying I couldn't find a few minutes a day to read a forum, but somehow I've managed to make it through these past few years without being called a faggot on a daily basis.'

  8. #8

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    Super cells


  9. #9

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    awesome!

    "TheLegend" go to userCP to edit sig etc. its at the top of the page next to FAQ
    I don't believe in belts. There should be no ranking system for toughness.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by MrHillman View Post
    awesome!

    "TheLegend" go to userCP to edit sig etc. its at the top of the page next to FAQ

    good man, job done
    Offical Roy Nelson Band Wagon Club President

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