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Thread: Forward and backward rolls?

  1. #1

    Default Forward and backward rolls?

    Most places seem to incorporate these in their warm ups. Do they actually have a functional purpose for BJJ, like shrimping for instance?

  2. #2

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    Arn't they a form of breakfalling?

  3. #3

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    First and foremost they teach the body to be able to rolled over the
    neck safely using a subconscious muscle memory so when you are stacked
    you have less chance of damaging your neck.

    Secondly,they teach the ability to roll to escape and sometimes attack
    in BJJ.

    It is vital to be able to roll over the shoulder and replace guard.
    Upside down guard is a more advanced position you will find easier if you're
    proficient in backwards rolling.

  4. #4

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    Oh right, thanks Simon. I've always wondered what they were all about. Sounds pretty important.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Rob T's Avatar
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    Default

    What Simon said... it's just a method of getting people used to the movements in jiu-jitsu. You'll be grateful you can backward roll and roll over your shoulders when someone 100kg+ decides to stack you from in your guard.
    http://www.ChrisReesAcademy.com - http://thetattooedchimp.blogspot.co.uk/

  6. #6
    Senior Member Luke's Avatar
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    I do these. Helps when you roll for submissions.

  7. #7

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    Not just good for training. I'm pretty certain getting into the habit of tucking your head in when you fall saved me from a fractured skull when I had a bike accident a couple of years ago. I was cycling down a steep hill, got a bit distracted, started wobbling, braked and landed hard on one side. I fractured and dislocated my shoulder but because I kept my hands on the handlebars and my arm extended as I went down my head was protected behind my shoulder (I was wearing a bike helmet as well). The helmet was crushed on one side and had to be thrown away but I remained conscious and was able to get up and walk away. My shoulder was a mess (x-ray at http://www.flickr.com/photos/mhoulden/2848554935/) but I got back to BJJ 9 weeks later once I'd been cleared by the physio.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Hayes View Post
    First and foremost they teach the body to be able to rolled over the
    neck safely using a subconscious muscle memory so when you are stacked
    you have less chance of damaging your neck.

    Secondly,they teach the ability to roll to escape and sometimes attack
    in BJJ.

    It is vital to be able to roll over the shoulder and replace guard.
    Upside down guard is a more advanced position you will find easier if you're
    proficient in backwards rolling.
    What he said.

    Nathan
    Head Coach at Leicester Shootfighters
    Sponsored by Caged Steel and Empire Fight Shop

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