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Thread: Slamming to escape submissions or guard?

  1. #11
    Senior Member Rob T's Avatar
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    If you want to slam, punch, kick, heelhook etc people... there's a sport called MMA.
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  2. #12

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    Slamming is illegal in most grappling events.

    ADCC is ultimately a professional event for money,a bit like MMA.

    If you are fighting for money then you have taken a decision to train and fight under a professional rule set.

    For all other grappling (BJJ or No Gi) the sport is amateur,meaning people compete as a hobby.

    To expose people to techniques that could radically change their lives deliberately in an amateur sporting event would be completely wrong.

    A slam to escape a triangle or an armbar,or even guard could break your opponents neck.

    A judo throw is completely different,you can breakfall.You can't breakfall when you are slammed,that is the important distinction.

    The Last Star Fighter,without wanting to seem rude,saying you are good at slamming is like me saying "I am good at sticking my fingers in people's eyes".Everyone is good at slamming because there is no skill needed,the reason other people may not appear 'good' at it,is because they don't do it because it is dangerous,against the rules and not part of anyones game (unless they are Pro MMA fighters and training within those rules).

    If you enjoy slamming people i would get in a cage and do it,where it will be applauded,but be careful because you may end up on the receiving end of a slam.

    If someone tries to slam me,i see it as a deliberate attempt to injure me.

  3. #13

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    A few years ago,Rorian Gracie decided to run a competition with more 'realistic' rules.

    Here is the result of a slam in that competition-

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57J54...D3D27&index=18

  4. #14
    Senior Member Luke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob T View Post
    If you want to slam, punch, kick, heelhook etc people... there's a sport called MMA.
    This! I hate it when people use strength over technique.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Hayes View Post
    Slamming is illegal in most grappling events.

    ADCC is ultimately a professional event for money,a bit like MMA.

    If you are fighting for money then you have taken a decision to train and fight under a professional rule set.

    For all other grappling (BJJ or No Gi) the sport is amateur,meaning people compete as a hobby.

    To expose people to techniques that could radically change their lives deliberately in an amateur sporting event would be completely wrong.

    A slam to escape a triangle or an armbar,or even guard could break your opponents neck.

    A judo throw is completely different,you can breakfall.You can't breakfall when you are slammed,that is the important distinction.

    The Last Star Fighter,without wanting to seem rude,saying you are good at slamming is like me saying "I am good at sticking my fingers in people's eyes".Everyone is good at slamming because there is no skill needed,the reason other people may not appear 'good' at it,is because they don't do it because it is dangerous,against the rules and not part of anyones game (unless they are Pro MMA fighters and training within those rules).

    If you enjoy slamming people i would get in a cage and do it,where it will be applauded,but be careful because you may end up on the receiving end of a slam.

    If someone tries to slam me,i see it as a deliberate attempt to injure me.
    The above post illustrates perfectly to me why slamming is not allowed in grappling comps. Thank you. Having never competed in a BJJ or grappling competition I was curious as to what the reasons were behind this.

    I currently only train MMA (never competed MMA either btw) and I do slam people in sparring. No one has ever objected to me doing this and I've had others do the same to me without incident. Although me still being relatively inexperienced I am beginning to get the impression from what some of you are saying that I (and some of my training partners) shouldn't be quite so cavalier about slams.

    Having tried Judo in the past I eventually gave it up as I really disliked the constant soreness from being thrown 100 plus times per session (I know, I'm a pussy). I equated that as being no worse than slamming although I suppose the difference is you don't drill slams 100 plus times like you do Judo throws. I see now that if you did you'd probably be in a wheelchair.

    However, is there really no skill involved in slams? I mean none at all? For instance, in MMA how is it that some fighters can use slams more effectively than others? Is it really just pure brute strength?

    I used to train lots of weights focusing mostly on squats and deadlifts and I used to be able to squat some pretty high numbers for my weight. Of course this puts me at a huge advantage at slamming when compared to someone who has never added squats to their training regime. But aren't there are other factors to consider such as leverage, posture and positioning of feet when attempting a slam. Brute force alone is not enough surely?

    When people see a fighter slamming another fighter don't they ever admire what it took for him to do that? Or do they always view a slam as the meatheads way out?

    I realise that I'm basically posting about an MMA issue in the BJJ forum but it was the fact that it's not allowed in BJJ that initially sparked my curiosity. Hence my reason for posting in the BJJ forum.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post


    However, is there really no skill involved in slams? I mean none at all? For instance, in MMA how is it that some fighters can use slams more effectively than others? Is it really just pure brute strength?


    .
    yes

    10 characters

  7. #17
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    Allan "No" Love
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    A high elevated take down that results in a slam is a highly technical and appreciated skill that is legal in BJJ. There is nothing against high amplitude take downs in BJJ

    Slamming to escape guard is a clueless meathead move.

    Slamming to escape a submission is a risky strategy but one that can work. Defending against the slam while applying a submission should be taught as part of BJJ even though it is not allowed in competitions.

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post
    But aren't there are other factors to consider such as leverage, posture and positioning of feet when attempting a slam. Brute force alone is not enough surely?
    If you take Prof Hayes youtube video, thats not a technical deadlift, theres no technique involved. Just grip his collar and lifting from his back.

    The back of the head is an extremely vulnerable area, and people place their opponents or worse, their training partners in unnecessary danger just because they haven't learnt an escape or enough sub awareness to try and avoid the sub in the first place.
    http://www.isaninja.co.uk

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Last Starfighter View Post
    Is this viewed by many as a legitimate technique?

    Is it ever effective?

    Only asking as I see it's against the rules for neaxt years ground control tournaments. Is this usually the case for competitions?
    its not really allowed. and in the gym you shouldnt really do it but you get pricks that do it coz your gunna make them tap ,
    If size mattered, the elephant would be the king of the jungle, The mind is like a parachute -- it works best when it is open." - Rickson Gracie

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