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Thread: Is this just bad or is it me?

  1. #1

    Default Is this just bad or is it me?





    1, why is he sitting up so far on the chest?
    2, why is he using the wrist and not the Bicep?

  2. #2
    Senior Member 1inchPonch's Avatar
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    I move up to the chest to avoid getting put back into half guard and I'd probably grab a wrist/sleeve if someone was stupid enough to stick their arms in the air like that while mounted.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by oddball View Post




    1, why is he sitting up so far on the chest?
    2, why is he using the wrist and not the Bicep?
    1, It's called high mount. Takes away his elbow leverage used for escapes. Also as you can see leaves his arms weak and vulnerable to attacks. With good posture at the bottom he should have trouble getting that high mount. I also keep a mental note of a arm on stand by to base out if he tries to buck me forward.

    2, Why not? I don't think it matters getting bogged down with details just look at bigger picture of what he is trying to achieve.

    Out of curiosity what do you do when you get mount ?? just grapevine the legs??
    .....

  4. #4

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    I suppose there's positives and negatives to both approaches, but I like to grab the wrist as well, if you hook the bicep, people will commonly be able to get a gable or russian grip with their hands and that leaves you in the position of having to break their grips open before you finish the sub. Depends what works for you personally.

  5. #5

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    Other than the guy having his arms sticking up in the air (which I'm assuming is just being down to show the technique), I don't really see anything wrong with that
    Scotlands No. 1 Timekeeper also available as a BJJ/No Gi referee

  6. #6

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    1) high mount
    2) doent matter too much.

    ok basic armbar, i'd say it's just you
    man, when you're the nail, hang in there....until the day you become the hammer

  7. #7

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    I must admit I prefer to grab the bicep, although I agree one needs to be fairly confident when it comes to breaking any defensive grip. However, when someone gifts their arm like the uke my personal preference is to put both hands on the ukes chest, spin and take the arm only when I'm in a position to hyperextend it. Whilst this doesn't work on an experienced grappler, an experienced grappler will rarely put their arms out straight like that.

  8. #8

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    I have to admit I have never seen a black belt show armbar from mount like that I have seen a few white belts try it and lose the position and arm though.
    Heres my observations sitting high on the chest is gambiling with ones balance also I find it much easier to escape from this ( inverted escape ) and take the back.
    Taking the wrist has less control and your opponent can snatch it out or wait until you drop back to roll and escape, taking the bicep and ones collar is much tighter if you are doing the armbar with out hands on chest ( like bomberh's example ). If your opponent gable grips I go direct to bicep crush or wristlock and get the tap that way. just my humble opinion
    Last edited by oddball; 21-01-2011 at 12:46 AM.

  9. #9

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    I don't understand why it is gambling with your balance?

    I've seen plenty of people at various levels in comps use high mount successfully. Usually as they finish the fight.

    As for the wrist/bicep thing, i guess that's down to opinion.

    One thing though... Aren't bicep crushes illegal in gi comps? Pretty sure only brown/black and no gi allow them? Which is a shame as they're a nice counter.

  10. #10

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    Classic armbar right out of the Gracie self-defence curriculum, nothing wrong with it at all.
    Quote Originally Posted by bomberh View Post
    However, when someone gifts their arm like the uke my personal preference is to put both hands on the ukes chest, spin and take the arm only when I'm in a position to hyperextend it. Whilst this doesn't work on an experienced grappler, an experienced grappler will rarely put their arms out straight like that.
    I think this version is better than that one for practical purposes because it doesn't leave quite such a hilariously enormous gap. The 'hands on chest' version is really just a drill to teach the hip-turn for the armbar IMHO.

    Against anyone competent I'd prefer to S-mount, takes away the space for them to get their elbow back and eliminates the feet-in-armpits escape, but this video seems to be for beginners and that is often a bit too complicated for them.

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