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Thread: Welcome Rosi Sexton & The Combat Clinic

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  1. #1

    Default Welcome Rosi Sexton & The Combat Clinic

    Rosi Sexton aka The Combat Clinic will now be here to answer all your questions on training, fighting or sports injuries.

    Please respect Rosi's time and stay on topic .
    Last edited by administrator; 03-01-2012 at 01:00 PM.

  2. #2

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    Welcome Rosi
    Professional MMA Referee www.mmaofficials.co.uk

  3. #3

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    Rosi knows what she is doing! I suffering with a really painful recurring injury in my back and she sorted it in about 30 minutes and I have never had a problem with it since!

  4. #4

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    Rosi,

    My hip is killing me. I think it may be a lower-back injury/sciatica (the doctor said she thinks I have injured my back and that's what's causing the pain down the back of my leg). The symptoms sound about right. My right foot is numb and I have a pain shooting down my right leg. I've been given some exercises to do to 'strengthen my core' but if anything it has made it worse over the course of a couple of weeks. I feel like exercises to 'strengthen my core' may be a bit of a farce, seeing as I was training bjj 3 times a week, cycling 30+ miles a week, running, climbing and doing yoga before the pain.

    From what I have looked up, it sounds like a disc injury. Problem is doctors tend to treat each patient as though their lifestyles don't depend on a heavy amount of physical activity.

    Apart from bugging the doctors until they shell out for a scan/some actual tests, is there anything you'd suggest to aid in my recovery? I feel pretty good exercising with good posture, I think I could manage a reasonable weights routine. It's simple things like getting comfortable in bed/getting out of chairs etc that's when the pain hits.

    Thanks!
    When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail.

  5. #5
    Rosi Sexton
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    Atlasmma - although it's impossible to say for sure without seeing you myself, it sounds like your understanding of the situation is quite good.

    The problem with "core strength" work is that it's largely become a meaningless buzzword in the fitness industry. There is such a thing as good core strength training, but there's no guarantee that everything labelled as such is either effective, or suitable for your particular problem. However, it's worth noting that even otherwise very fit and strong athletes can have relative weaknesses or muscle imbalances that can leave them more vulnerable to certain kinds of back problem.

    Here's a collection of stuff I've already written that may or may not be helpful:

    Lower back pain, part 1
    Lower back pain, part 2
    Sitting: reducing the strain on your back
    Hip hinging

    I also recommend Stuart McGill's work on core strength - his books "Low back disorders" and "ultimate back performance" are well worth taking a look if you're interested in the details of what's going on.

    Scans and tests are unlikely to be particularly helpful at this stage. Generally, there's no point getting one, unless it's going to change the course of treatment. But by the sounds of things, the diagnosis is most likely correct (again, as far as I can tell without seeing you myself). If you were at a point where surgery was being considered, then it might be worthwhile, but from what you have described, that's probably not the case at the moment.

    The good news is that while disc injuries can be incredibly painful, and sometimes take a considerable time to settle down, most will eventually get better by themselves without needing surgery.

    Most of all, though, I'd recommend finding a good practitioner by recommendation (such as a good osteopath or private physiotherapist) who can discuss your individual case with you. If you let me know where in the country you are based, I may be able to suggest someone who could help.

    All the best, and good luck!
    Looking for injury, rehab or nutrition advice? visit combatsportsclinic.com

    Fighting out of Next Generation

  6. #6

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    Thanks Rosi, that's great! I read your blog on my lunch break today and it definitely made me think about what I put my back through on a daily basis (I'm either sat in an office or sat in a car for work).

    I'm based in Bristol, so if you know anyone near by it'd be great!
    When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail.

  7. #7
    Rosi Sexton
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    you have PM!
    Looking for injury, rehab or nutrition advice? visit combatsportsclinic.com

    Fighting out of Next Generation

  8. #8

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    Hi Rosi i had a scaphoid fracture in my right wrist,i had the operation last March and still when i touch my wrist it feels different i dont know if this is because i had to get a bone graft and a screw inserted,will this ever feel normal or always fell different even when i am training it feels different?

  9. #9
    Rosi Sexton
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    Quote Originally Posted by DBOMB MCG View Post
    Hi Rosi i had a scaphoid fracture in my right wrist,i had the operation last March and still when i touch my wrist it feels different i dont know if this is because i had to get a bone graft and a screw inserted,will this ever feel normal or always fell different even when i am training it feels different?
    Some people do find that when they have screws implanted it affects sensitivity in the area. Sometimes people get the metalware taken out (once it's done its job), and some feel better for it. Another possibility is that it's caused by the build up of scar tissue from the injury and operation - in some instances massage can help to make the scar tissue more pliable and less sensitive. Obviously, though, this needs to be handled with care. Finally, it could be that the operation affected the nerves in the area. It's hard to say without seeing you for myself which of these is most likely.

    Sorry to be vague, but hope this helps a little.
    Looking for injury, rehab or nutrition advice? visit combatsportsclinic.com

    Fighting out of Next Generation

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rosi View Post
    Some people do find that when they have screws implanted it affects sensitivity in the area. Sometimes people get the metalware taken out (once it's done its job), and some feel better for it. Another possibility is that it's caused by the build up of scar tissue from the injury and operation - in some instances massage can help to make the scar tissue more pliable and less sensitive. Obviously, though, this needs to be handled with care. Finally, it could be that the operation affected the nerves in the area. It's hard to say without seeing you for myself which of these is most likely.

    Sorry to be vague, but hope this helps a little.
    Thanks alot for the feedback ,really appreciate it :-)

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