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Thread: Improving Anaerobic Energy System for MMA

  1. #11
    Rosi Sexton
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    I've read quite a few negative articles about steady state LD running lately, do you think there's still a place for it in terms of developing cardio for MMA?
    As a slight aside, I quite like Jameson's take on LSD work - it fits pretty much exactly with my experience. http://www.8weeksout.com/2012/02/23/...-the-comeback/
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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by brendanchaplin View Post
    I'd drop the LSD mate yea and put in some intervals or MMA tabata style circuits.
    The main area for LSD for me is dropping weight, not convinced it'll make you a better fighter/trainer etc. Occasional longer intervals like 5 minute row etc can be effective for aerobic development if you need it.

    I'd say 2-3x per week for 15-20 minutes are so you'll see some benefits.

    As an example of aerobic work, just look at Nick Diaz. The guy pressures his man for 25 minutes none stop, with high intensity.
    He is an aerobic athlete doing triathlons and stuff in his spare time!

    Okay there are more explosive athletes in the UFC, but he is a perfect example of someone who utilises his aerobic system pretty darn well and has ALOT of success.
    Thanks for that mate. What sort of Tabata's do you use for mma related training?
    "The more you sweat in peace, the less you bleed in war"
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  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by londonpride View Post
    Thanks for that mate. What sort of Tabata's do you use for mma related training?
    In terms of exercise selection? Burpees, Heavy Bag, Lateral shuffles, jump squats, push-up variations etc, pummelling are all good choices
    S&C Made Easy: http://www.brendanchaplin.co.uk/ twitter @brendanchaplin

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by brendanchaplin View Post
    There is minimal literature available though, What level of fighter was the research conducted on? Was it a controlled study? I've not seen much that actually has peer reviewed research on elite fighters in this area, however I would be more than open to it if its out there! Do you have the reference?

    If the fighters were sub elite how do we really use that? They might be using their anaerobic pathways more so than aerobic because they have to and aerobic not developed fully! So we cannot just assume that it is the anaerobic pathways that predominate.

    All the higher level pro fighters I've trained have had a high aerobic capacity but at the end of the day the best way to get results is to coach/develop the athlete. By that i mean if you have an athlete who is very poor aerobically but extremely powerful anaerobically I would suggest that athlete needs to improve his/her aerobic capacity to be able to train for longer durations and maintain technique under fatigue.
    If they have excellent aerobic fitness but poor anaerobic then do the opposite and most will be somewhere in the middle. Obviously it needs to be specific to obtain best transfer.

    Using MMA tabatas or equivalent develops all the systems, and is also specific preparation which can be made even more specific by studying your fighters movement patterns and working on these in the circuit. This seems to produce good transfer for me.

    The baseline level of fitness is important and I go more into this in the webinar earlier this year. How you obtain it is down to the fighter coach but I would suggest that aerobic intervals are used. 2012 Webinar

    For me its simple, get em strong and powerful then increase the durations that force and technique can be produced with intensity in a reverse periodised fashion with the end goal of 3-5x5 minute rounds in mind. I don't think i've talked about energy systems in a long time and apart from the odd guy who is poor aerobically on some of the baseline measures, I don't tend to stress "energy system development" very much at all.

    As one of the athletic development greats Vern Gambetta puts it "Build it first, then learn to endure it".
    Hi Brendan, Sorry for the delayed reply. Haven't been on the forums in a while. The literature was a review on the sports that make up mixed martial arts as any other literature I have viewed was done on amatuer mixed martial artists which I disregard as it will almost be unapplicable to those who are serious about making it as a career or fighting professionally.

    I am currently completing my degree in S&C at the moment and focusing on combat sports as a whole like yourself (I know you've done other things too after being on your website).

    My personal approach is to develop the fighters strength and power initally then work on the aerobic conditioning but usually utisiling high intensity training to maintain the appropriate fibers.

    I personally am not a fan of long steady state cardio for conditioning. I have done it myself and really not found much benefit as my posterior chain just feels weak.

    I'll try keep in touch as it's great to see others trying to piece together the insanity that is the most efficient way for training for mixed martial arts.

  5. #15
    Rosi Sexton
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    I personally am not a fan of long steady state cardio for conditioning. I have done it myself and really not found much benefit as my posterior chain just feels weak.
    Not really sure I see the connection between steady state cardio and a weak posterior chain. Care to elaborate?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rosi View Post
    Not really sure I see the connection between steady state cardio and a weak posterior chain. Care to elaborate?
    Sorry I was more or less referencing to running as that - what I have seen and been asked about many times - is typically the staple choice for improving cardio for many fighters without guidance. I know ample fighters who I have come across and will do hours of treadmill work.

    And by a weak posterior chain lets say I do an hour run on a treadmill... The very next day my lower back feels like someone has taken a sledge hammer to it, my hamstrings are very tight and if i attemped any lower limbed compound exercise the weight would feel a lot heavier. Obviously some of that would be due to fatigue but I also argue that it makes your body battle for priority of the fiber types.

    Why waste all that time when you could have completed a HIIT session and reaped up more benefits.

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