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Thread: Why no structure to bjj training?

  1. #11

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    I think BJJ is better with out the structured grading, just because some one can remember a series of movements doesn't mean they can do them in a live situation.

    Same as if a white belt triangles a Purple, doesn't instantly warrant him getting his blue, the instructor will be keeping a eye on him and will probably roll with him to see if he is ready.
    It seems more organic that way IMO.

    Also I think the best way to go out and really see if you're worth your next belt (if you really care) is to compete against people better than you that way even if you're not going up the belt ranks you're still proving you're on the same skill level as some one with a higher belt rank than you.

    But they're only for holding your pants up any way.

  2. #12

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    Hi Alberto,

    I must say from your thread title I expected a different post

    If you are lucky enough to live near a bjj club (or more) and you are lucky enough to afford the time, money and energy to train, then that's a fantastic opportunity to learn this wonderful art and sport.

    No structure to training? Some clubs may lack that. I have trained at a few and they all seemed to have at least some structure to both the individual sessions and how these sessions form part of the whole.

    At the Labs, we have a 20 week rotational curriculum in the fundamentals sessions to make sure if you miss a topic due to a holiday/injury...etc. it is covered again in the not too far future. Over, say, two years of consistent training this is repeated approximately 4-5 times. This has produced great results. Our chief instructor David Onuma recently promoted our first batch of blue belts and he had lots of praise for how well-rounded they were when sparring against resistance.

    But that's structure in training, not grading.

    No one should be graded in BJJ simply because they can show a set number of moves against a compliant partner (at least not in most clubs and organisations). I suppose nothing stops an instructor from doing that, but she will know if that student was to roll with a freshly graded student from another club where the ability to roll (technically) had been truely tested they will be tapping like a woodpecker.

    On the surface, I must say the whole "you will get graded when your instructor thinks you're ready" may seem a little loosely defined but in all fairness the reality is a different matter. The absolute majority of people I've rolled with over the past 6-7 years have had skills that correspond with the colour of their belt.

    When you roll, you can't hide behind the colour of a belt. You can't hide behind a shiney pretty gi. You can't hide.

    You can sometimes hide behind your strength and size, but not for long.

    As for structure, there are only 5 belts in adult BJJ (white, blue, purple, brown and black) and it takes a long time between white and black. Many many years. Simple maths will tell you that there will be a spectrum of skill-levels WITHIN each belt, since most people take a number of years between belts. It is not uncommon for two purple belts to both look and feel like purple belts but when they roll with each other there is clear difference of skill and ability. Add to that the factor that Jiu jitsu is a huge art with many positions and you will quickly see that by purple belt level (for example) players will have specialities and they might catch another player from the same belt with their speciality during a 5-10 minute roll. It happens. It doesn't take away from either belt holder (all other factors staying the same).

    Another thing. When David did the grading, he also gave 4-stripes to some white belts and told them exactly what they need to work on in order to make that jump to blue. That was a great opportunity for them to learn from a highly experienced teacher and black belt how to best structure their Open Mat time for the coming months-year. Could he have done it without the stripes? sure, but that is his chosen method. Our job now is to remind them at every opportunity what those priorities are.

    As for the Roy Dean method of offering students the opportunity to showcase their skills against a compliant partner, it's a nice way to show what BJJ is. If I've heard the following once, I've heard it a million times:

    "So Liam, how's that Kung fu stuff that you do going?" followed by a 45 degree chopping motion and a noise.

    As it's been explained here on the thread, that's not the only way Roy grades. They are just demos and an opportunity to show your wife or husband that you can do funky shizzle with your legs!

    Grading in BJJ is, IMO, a dot in continuous line. It's part of a learning curve. Your instructor's job is to follow and guide your progress in BJJ in the months and years you train at his or her academy.

    Sorry for the waffle
    Last edited by liamwandi; 07-03-2012 at 01:58 PM. Reason: spelling
    The Part Time Grappler - Just Google BJJ / Grappling Tips and you'll find me

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by liamwandi View Post
    Sorry for the waffle
    Not a waffle at all dude.

    Cheers for your reply

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by liamwandi View Post
    At the Labs, we have a 20 week rotational curriculum in the fundamentals sessions to make sure if you miss a topic due to a holiday/injury...etc. it is covered again in the not too far future. Over, say, two years of consistent training this is repeated approximately 4-5 times. This has produced great results. Our chief instructor David Onuma recently promoted our first batch of blue belts and he had lots of praise for how well-rounded they were when sparring against resistance.
    Every club should do this, some times learning a new thing every lesson can get annoying, it's good to have a beginners class to go to and just keep perfecting fundamentals.

  5. #15

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    Alberto tell us a bit about your situation, are you a student who doesnt have structure and would like it, or are you a teacher looking to improve your gym??? am curious so very interested in ur reply. thanks

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by the mid 90's View Post
    it's good to have a beginners class to go to and just keep perfecting fundamentals.
    I know what you mean. I used to teach every Fundamentals session but now I make sure I teach one and Martyn teaches one so I can jump in and drill drill drill.
    The Part Time Grappler - Just Google BJJ / Grappling Tips and you'll find me

  7. #17

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    Rewards:- keeping fit, learning skills, good training partners, team work, friendship, real abilities and opportunities to train with some of the finest grapplers in the world.

  8. #18
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    When you win some medals, tap most of the same belts and maybe tap some higher belts your ready for the next belt.....not before!
    (Irish Accent) I like a good posh wank, you know!

  9. #19

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    In my opinion, you start smashing blue belts then your instructer will reconise this and award you simple as, still not been awarded anything? smash the purple belts.. still not been awarded? guess what smash the brown belts! still nothing smash the instructor!

    for anyone who says they dont feel their being taught due to personal hygene or bad attitude, get on the mat and spar. the more you practise the better you get if you have been training 8 years and still a white belt then im inclined to believe you turn up once a month get your ass wooped then come back in another month.

    I got my black belt in taekwondo in like 3 years and when i got that it was meh, getting just a tab in BJJ i felt over the frickin moon becouse i had trained hard and beaten people who were better then me when i started, I tapped over 1000's of times but each time i got tapped i learnt from it and found the escapes..

    Moral of the story Spar > Win > Be happy knowing your skills show you reward enough.
    "Death and pain are just a small price to pay for the enjoyment of battle!"

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